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america." for the first time, the pentagon allows american women to serve in combat roles. britain, germany, and the netherlands are to their citizens to get out of benghazi, libya in response to an imminent threat against westerners. >> just touched a button. it hands you the picture. >> it brought us a new age of instant photography. tonight, we focus on the man whose polaroids help capture our lives in real time. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it is time for policy to catch up with reality. that was the message that leon panetta said today as he lifted a ban on women serving in combat. acknowledge in the sacrifices which have already been made by both sexes, he talked of a future where everyone would be given the opportunity to serve in front line rolls. what's the next greatest generation will be one of men and women who will fight and die together to protect this nation. that is what freedom is all about. >> leon panetta there. what do these changes mean and how does the u.s. military compare with other countries like britain? our
. women already make up 15% of the overall force and 17% of the officers in the military, but the pentagon's latest decision update updates a 1994 policy change that prohibited women from serving in ground combat units. only, excluding women from combat units never excluded them from the consequences of conflict. women have been working alongside combat units in support roles that put them right in the middle of conflicts where the new front line is wherever the next ied or mortar attack or suicide bomb happens to b and while the u.s. military's old policy discriminated against the women as the casualties can attest, the attackers did not. 283,000 women have been deployed to iraq and afghanistan since 2001, and since then, more than 800 women have been wounded and more than 130 killed in those conflicts. so the pentagon's announcement was not only welcomed, but long overdue, and more importantly, it also shatters what has been a nearly impenetrable brass ceiling. the military is most likely to be populated be by officers with combat experience and that meant before now, they were most like
is no longer on hold. that's after the pentagon inspector general cleared allen of any wrongdoing in e-mail exchanges with a tampa, florida woman. allen steps down as overall coalition commander in afghanistan next month. the air force's top general vowed today to put an end to sexual misconduct within the service. figures for 2012 show some 800 reported incidents. many of the cases stemmed from a scandal at lackland air force base near san antonio. an investigation there found 32 instructors allegedly engaged in sexual misconduct with nearly 60 female service members. at a house hearing, the air force chief of staff general mark welsh called the numbers appalling. >> there is no way we can allow this to happen again. the air force goal for sexual assault is not simply to lower the number. the goal is zero. it's the only acceptable objective. the impact on every victim, their family, their friends, the other people in their unit is heartwrenching. and attacking this cancer is a full-time job and we are giving it our full attention. so far, six training instructors from lackland have be
up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was set in motion today at the pentagon. >> not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> brown: with that, defense secretary leon panetta-- joined by the chair of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey-- announced he's ending a 1994 ban on women in combat roles. >> as secretary, when i've gone to bethesda to visit wounded warriors, when i've gone to arlington to bury our dead, there is no distinction that's made between the sacrifices of man and women in uniform. they serve, they're wounded and they die right next to each other. the time has come to recognize that reality. >> brown: nearly 300,000 women have deployed over the past 11 years in iraq and afghanistan, where the frontlines aren't so clearly drawn. and 152 have died there. today's decision opens up some 230,000 battlefront positions to women, many in army and marine infantry units. commanders will have to decide whether women will be eligible for elite forces, such as the navy seals and the army's d
of defense has no changes planned. >> for more on the pentagon's announcement, i spoke a short time ago to a former army sergeant who served in deployment in iraq. thank you very much for coming in. let me pick up on what the lieutenant general was saying. he says it is not sexist but it would be lowering standards to put women on the front line. >> the military is not lowering standards. women have been serving in combat for a decade now. and one of the other issues that the military struggle is with -- struggles with is that only 25% of people qualify for military service. unfortunately, 75% are to physically unfit, not educated enough, or have criminal backgrounds. if we want to get the best in military service, we need to make sure that women are part of the population. >> you have to open the door for everybody. they would have to meet physical fitness standards. they're not actually lowering standards. few served in iraq. >> i did. >> you were shot at. >> we took small arms fire and direct fire. that is true. >> you were in a combat position? >> that's right, i went on patrol with
some news last month that the pentagon purchased 5,000 copies. let me finish it. and it's for counter intelligence training, 101 and mandatory reading for they're course encounter intelligence. this is in tan sa any a. i went there when i was three years old and my father founded a medical center and my mother started a school. it was a wonderful childhood. i went to school with children from two dozen countries. with jews and christians and hindus and for me that was the way the world was. finally it came time to come back to america. i was in high school and really looking forward to coming back to a place whether i heard about fourth of jewels lies anulies . i got beat up. they said you're not from america. it wasn't in africa that i learned about racism but here in united states. we were completely broke and i did something real unpopular at the time. four days after high school i joind the united states army. not only to serve my country but to get the,gi bill to continue my education. then i saw young men and women from all across america. from farms and ranches and it matedm m
happening on the ground. bill: jennifer griffin is on the front line of the pentagon every day. what will this change, if anything, for women in the military, jennifer? >> reporter: essentially, bill, this will open 230,000 positions that have previously been that woman in the military had not had access to. it will open the positions in the army and marines in particular because those are the front line infantry troops. secretary panetta plans to make the announcement later today. he will officially lift the ban that has been in place since 199 on women serving in the front lines. again this will be thousands of positions that women had previously been denied access to. the service chiefs have until january 2016 to seek exceptions to certain units. some of the special operations units for instance. women who have been affected by the ban say they were denied promotions as a result of the discriminatory policy over the years, bill. bill: jennifer, women have for some time have contributed to mightily to the war on terror. they drive tanks. they knife airplanes in the air force. a lot
. the pentagon lifts the 20-year ban on women in combat. opening new career opportunities for thousands of soldiers. live coverage coming up of secretary panetta's big announcement. >> perpetrators of these horrific crimes to attain powerful military-stiz weapons. >> can the weapon get bipartisan support? coming up here new york city kirsten with new details on her bill to crack down on illegal gun trafficking. and the lip sync controversy continues. stephen colbert. >> yes, lip-gate. beyonce-gate. the crisis in lipia. beyonc-ghazi. was there a second singer on the grassy knolls? mr. president, the american people demand answers. what did beyonce sing? when did she sing it? is that even beyonce? it could have been sasha fierce. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. as expected, senator john kerry technically still the chair of the foreign relations committee holding his confirmation hearing today and counted no op sxwligs at that meeting. joining me now is senator bob corker, the top republican on the committee. senator, is it safe to assume that barring some unexpected,
to bring it here on c-span but the hearing went late. under way at the pentagon, a briefing with general martin dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs and leon panetta, the defense secretary, announcing a change, the lifting of the ban of the use of women in combat. let's get back to the focus of the phone calls here on c-span. biggest foreign policy challenge for the next four years. democratic caller in florida. caller: i have been watching the program all morning and i see the biggest foreign policy challenge in the next four years is not so much one that takes us out of the country as it is bringing democrats and republicans together to do what's best for our country in regards to foreign policy. that's where i see the biggest challenge in the next four years is bringing those two parties together so we can all be safe and enjoy the freedoms that we have today. host: do you think it makes it easier for that to happen with the president appointing someone like john kerry? caller: i think john kerry is a prime example of how we can probably get that done just because of his nature of br
, pentagon, and white house all were quick to call this attack terrorism. >> let's not forget, this is an act of terror. the perpetrators are the terrorists. >> terrorists should be on notice. there will find no sanctuary, no refuge, not in algeria, north africa,not anywhere. >> the u.s. military sent a c130 and a transport plane to evacuate the wounded, but the algerians are still rejecting any foreign counter-terrorism help at the bp complex. those who escaped described how the algerian military straight the convoy of five buses leaving the compound hitting the first four. an irish hostage to escape told his brother the attackers but bomb built on them as they were transferring them by bus to another part of the facility. others praised the actions of the algerian military. >> ever been so relieved. going off site. >> yesterday the assyrians polled by that the incident was over. that's not true. >> west but to the algerian prime minister he told me that this first operation was complete but this is a larger complex site and they are still pursuing terrorists and possibly some hostages and o
question: is there a nonviolent peacemaking army that can shut down the pentagon? and you challenged us to breathe in bernard haring's words: the materialistic growth--mania for more and more production and more and more markets for selling unnecessary and even damaging products is a sin against the generation to come what shall we leave to them: rubbish, atomic weapons numerous enough to make the earth uninhabitable, a poisoned atmosphere, polluted water? "love in practice is a harsh and dreadful thing compared to love in dreams," said a russian writer. now i know at great cost martin that as we burn something moves out of the flames (call it spirit or apparition) till no fire or body or ash remain we breathe out and smell the world again aye-aye-aye ayo-ayo-ayo ayeee- ayeee-ayeee amen men men men awoman woman woman woman men men men woman woman woman men men woman woman men woman womanmen. the earth has tilted, tear martin, as the wicked each morning to an internal alarm clock called hope, i count the morning stars, the air so sweet anointing the day, hope comes on warning sales and w
center at the pentagon and the c.i.a. operations center. having works as an officer at the center i know that any information that indicates a threat to the safety of american citizens overseas is passed to other agencies mentioned above. if it is a significant message concerning american interests that is received it is the watch officers job to ensure the other agencies are informed." he goes on "there are many questions that need to be answered." i would like to present the questions. first, what was going on at the ops center of the state department in washington, dc, while our consulate was under attack if seven hours? >> we can certainly give you greater center but it is, as you have describeed, the place where communications go in and out. they were placing calls and receiving calls and deeply engaged in trying to help us. they don't reach out on their own but to help us acquire information so we could respond in real time. >> seven hours? there should have been a response. why the delay if laboring it as terrorism when it was immediately known that it was? >> again, i would say,
at the pentagon and the cia's op center. having worked as a watch officer, i know that any information that indicates a threat to the safety of american citizens overseas is passed to other agencies mentioned above. if it's of significant message concerning interest received, it is to watch officer job to make sure the other agency are informed. he goes on, there many questions that need to be answered and would like to present them on his behalf. first and foremost, what was going on at the op center in washington while our consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> they were placing calls and deeply engaged in trying to help us. they don't reach out on their own, but it help us acquire information to respond in realtime. >> in seven hours, goodness gracious. there should have been a response. why did the labeling attack as terrorism when it was immediately known that it was. >> again, i would say, congressman, that we described the attack. i described the attack the next morning and the president called it an act of terror. there was as you will find in reading both the unclassif
the 9/11 attacks. the hearing begins in a disagreement between the pentagon and the chief prosecutor in the case regarding the legality of some of the charges. attempts by the u.s. government to legitimatize these military tribunals have been complicated by the fact that the only two convictions of guantanamo bay prisoners via tribunals have been reversed by civilian appeals courts. the administration is also facing heat over its continued reliance on drone strikes. according to figures compiled by the london-based bureau of investigative journalism, the u.s. has conducted 362 drone strikes in pakistan since 2004 with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appoin
failing to stop the consumer protection bureau's creation in 2010. the pentagon official has removed the longstanding military ban on women in combat. defense secretary panetta formally announce the move in washington. >> it is clear to all of us that women are contributing in unprecedented ways to the military's mission of defending the nation. women represent 50% of the force, over 200,000. they are serving in a growing number of critical roles on and off the battlefield. the fact is, they have become integral part of our ability to perform our mission. >> in being officially allowed to serve in combat roles, women will be afforded opportunities for medals of recognition as well as for advancement to positions they have been unable to pursue. congressional leaders have reached an agreement altering rules for the senate filibuster, but leaving its core intact. a deal between senate majority leader harry reid and house republicans would impose new caps on how often lawmakers can filibuster bills they oppose, but preserve the current 60-vote threshold needed to pass a bill through the
aerial vehicles or, as the media likes to call them, drones. narrator: already the pentagon relies on a family of more than 10,000 drones, usually to spy but sometimes to kill. small enough to fit in a soldier's backpack, the three-foot-long raven is the most widely used spy drone in the world. the stealthy sentinel provided crucial intelligence in the raid to kill bin laden. the killer predator has flown thousands of missions since 2001 and the giant global hawk can stay aloft and spy for up to 35 hours. the military uses drones to support troops on the ground. the cia maintains a covert drone program to find and target individuals. the government claims drones have helped to eliminate up to 70% of al qaeda's top leadership. they have been so effective, the air force predicts nearly a third of its attack and fighter planes will be drones within a decade. planes can fly longer, they can pull more gs, they can be more precise when they bomb if a human is not in the cockpit. narrator: we're entering a new era when the supremacy of even the most advanced planes is be
of the pentagon, secretary of defense, secretary of defense panetta has said that he's going to lift the ban on women in combat. what's your thought on that? >> i think that i respect that judgment. i would emphasize that there are certain specialties that require certain physical capabilities and i would not bar women, for example, seal teams, okay? i would not bar them from them if that's the decision, but i hope that they would have to measure up to the same physical standards because these seals are the best example, they're a small unit. they have to depend on each other and i'm not saying that women can't perform that way i just hope that we would keep the same standard requirements for screening and eligibility to be a member particularly if some of our elite military units. >> greta: and another log jam issue in washington. one of my colleagues confirmed that speaker boyner told a group of republicans on the house side that president obama's focus is to annihilate the republican party. is that the collective viewpoint here in the republicans in the senate or not? >> greta, i've seen
's 60% of what they want to take additionally out of the pentagon. and that's government wide. so why would we do that? where's the leadership in the congress to say we're going to get this stopped? we're going to have a special subcommittee look at this, oversight it, look at the bad actors, look at the bad actors in government, and we're going to napped -- to demand the people who make those decisions get fired and the companies who are not performing pay the money back. none of that happens. so you can defraud the federal government, you cannot perform on a contract, and you can do it with impunity. and that's because members of congress are basically not willing or inexperienced to not know that you ought to be able to hold people accountable for what they say they're going to do. whether it's a federal employee, a procurement employee or the company that's providing that. and that's just one example that happened this week. >> host: senator coburn, what was the business you built before you went to medical school? >> guest: my father had started a machinery manufacturing business
of the united states senate. you can build a pentagon three times in that time frame. it's time that -- to pass a budget out of the united states senate and senator reid should not be paid until it's done. the house has acted responsibly. we have met our deadlines, we have set our priorities, i was part of the house budget committee when we put together budgets that try to get our out-of-control spending under control and rein in our $16 trillion in debt. the sfat has not acted one time in that time frame. it's time to make the hard choices and do the work necessary to restore fiscal responsibility to washington. it's time for senator reid to pass a budget or withhold his paycheck. thank you, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. we'll have order in the chamber, please. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i
recruiter. i have gone to the pentagon in support of the secretary of -- i'm sorry, sergeant major of the army in the 1980's so i'm going to say this and quantify by saying, on a security level, i think secretary clinton handled this very well. in the history of the united states, so much information is being demanded, that breaches security for the department of defense and all the other agencies within the military that i don't think these senators are aware of what they are asking her to divulge. when you say, why wasn't the video available? some information i classified -- is classified to a certain degree that they can't release it immediately. when we have people on foreign soil, our soldiers and marines, their jobs are limited by the act here in the united states and they know they can't go out there and say, hey, you guys are waving these flags, get away or to shoot them. they can't do that. so, to me, naive attitude that the senators who asked those hard questions were asking -- ludicrous. no way they should have been allowed to give responses immediately or to have firsth
"washington journal." then the senate confirmation hearing for john kerry. live coverage of the pentagon news conference with leon panetta and martin dempsey. and about 45 minutes, winnie stachelberg on gun control. max boot on foreign-policy. bradley shear worker rights in the workplace. >> as secretary i have no greater priority responsibility. as i have said many times, i take responsibility. nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to be the state department -- to leave the state department safer and more secure. it meant moving quickly to respond to the immediate crisis, but also to further protect our people in high threat areas across the region and the world. host: we will get your reaction this morning to hillary clinton's testimony yesterday. we do expect misses clinton on capitol hill again today as john kerry has his hearing to replace her. for the first 45 minutes, we will get your reaction to the testimony. what's being written and on television. this is your chance to weigh in on what happened yesterday. democ here is the front page of "the washington tim
, there is no sunset on this bill. >> defense secretary leon panetta announced that the pentagon is ending the ban on women serving in combat. that is next on c-span. then, remarks from bobby jindal at the republican national committee last night. washingtonning's journal, we talk with bill kristol of the weekly standard. washington journal starts at 7:00 east anern. the emancipation proclamation was issued 150 years ago. today, a discussion on race and president obama's term. hosted by the new america foundation and the washington monthly magazine. live coverage is at 10:00 a.m. eastern. later, live coverage of the republican national committee winter meeting. our coverage begins at 1:00 pm eastern. >> one of the key themes for any exhibition on the civil war is abolition and emancipation. we are fortunate that those men came of age when they did. they make issues around the emancipation and abolition issues around human rights and american freedom on a general non-race specific level. i will go through every piece of information that johnson was in this paper -- picture. if you pay attention to
in iraq was much worse than it appeared from from afar. i was coming out of the pentagon. it was clearly unsettled. it looked much worse than we had thought. the first hope was that if we got saddam hussein, that would solve the problem. we made an effort to do that. in december, we picked up saddam. it became obvious that, as one of my guys described, a bunch of former miss -- regime guys were not really running the beginning of the resistance, the beginning of the insurgency. zarqawi had started to build a network that took trained people, or iraqi sunnis -- trained people, iraqi sunnis, who had been dislocated from their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu mus
. it shall take a lot to pull this off. >> the pentagon has started to take steps to prepare itself for the sequestration and planning that has not taken place until now. >> they are laying off temporary employees. it is starting to happen. >> senator inhofe has been critical about not planning earlier. the >> there is a little brinkmanship going. i do believe there was a time and when each everybody said we are all against it so how can have them? there never was a path that the two sides could find that would lead them to averting it. >> the center was critical of the president in the stance of his overall military and mention three ways the president has worked for cuts, and delays, and additions to the military budget. when you talk to officers of line, and you find them as critical of the administration that what is: on average is very dramatic. this represents a huge threat to the united states. there are others that would argue it is more a regional. the ability to react is clearly limited. when you look at individual things, there are concernes. afghanistan is another issue.
was coming out of the pentagon. it was clearly unsettled. it looked much worse than we had thought. the first hope was that if we got saddam hussein, that would solve the problem. we made an effort to do that. appeared from from afar. in december, we picked up saddam. it became obvious that, as one of my guys described, a bunch of former miss -- regime guys were not really running the beginning of the resistance, the beginning of the insurgency. zarqawi had started to build a network that took trained people, or iraqi sunnis -- trained people, iraqi sunnis, who had been dislocated from their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu musab al-zarqawi. we were very sure he wa
lines to the white house situation room, the national military command center at the pentagon and the cia's op center. having worked as an officer, i know that any information that indicates a threat overseas is mentioned above. if the message is received, it is the officer's job to make sure that other agencies are informed. i would like to present these questions on his behalf. first and foremost, what was going on at the ops center in the state department while the consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> we can give you greater detail but it is as you described, the place for communications to go in and out. they were placing calls, receiving calls, deeply engaged in trying to help us. they help us require information so we can respond in real time. >> 7 hours, there should have been a response. white the delay when it was immediately known that it was? >> i would say that we described the attack, i described the attack the next morning, the president called it an act of terror. as you read in the classified and unclassified version, there were a lot of questions abo
john kerry, who testified at his confirmation hearing. today, leon panetta announced the pentagon was ending the ban on women serving in combat. we will have >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training you can get is walking a foot beat. you learn how to develop sources. you'll learn how to leverage relationships in the community. people in the community trust you, they will tell you when things are happening better not yet a crime. you can intervene. i really learned the most in my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother to the youngest police chief in washington, d.c., history, more with cathy lanier. >> secretary of state nominee john kerrey appeared at his confirmation hearing before the senate foreign relations committee. during this three-hour 15 minute hearing, he spoke about the september benghazi attacks and some of the foreign policy challenges facing the u.s., including iran, afghanistan, and syria. he also talked about the vietnam war after returning from vietnam over 40 years ago, he testified about his exp
to the white house situation room, the national military command center the pentagon and cia op center. having worked as a watch center in the information that has a threat to the safety of citizens overseas is passed through other agencies mentioned above. if it is of significant message concerning american interest is received, it is the watch officers, to ensure that these other agencies are informed. he goes on there are many other questions that need to be answered and i would present these questions on his behalf. first and foremost was going on at the office of the department in washington while our consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> well, we can certainly give you greater detail, but the center as you have described, you know it is the place communications goes in and out. they were receiving calls, they were deeply engaged in trying to help us. they don't reach out on their own but to help us acquire information so that we can respond in real time. >> in seven hours, goodness gracious there should have the response. why did labeling the attack as terrorism immediately know
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)